15.1 C
London
Sunday, April 18, 2021

Australian homes overrun with huntsman spiders thanks to summer baby boom

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Australian homes are being overrun by huntsman spiders thanks to the end of summer baby boom – but the critters are nothing to be afraid of.

The large, long-legged spiders known for their speed have appeared in droves this season as cities across the country cop a plague of arachnids. 

The sightings, which have been shared widely on social media, brought little comfort for those with arachnophobia.

But Dr Lizzie Lowe, an arachnologist at Macquarie University, said the ‘beautiful’ creepy crawlies are harmless as their eyesight is poor, they’re usually confused, and they’re not highly venomous.

Dr Lizzie Lowe, an arachnologist at Macquarie University, said the creepy crawlies are more likely to turn on each other than cause you harm (stock image)

Dr Lizzie Lowe, an arachnologist at Macquarie University, said the creepy crawlies are more likely to turn on each other than cause you harm (stock image)

‘Huntsmen don’t have very good eyesight. They see light and dark and movement and that’s about all. They will never intentionally run towards you because they’re small and not highly venomous. They can bite you, but they won’t do any harm,’ she told Weatherzone.

Dr Lowe said huntsman are ‘super fast’ but often confused and if they are charging towards you, confusion is the simple explanation. 

She said huntsman are not aggressive spiders and they typically stay up high because they are finding food to eat.   

Dr Lowe said huntsman are ‘summer spiders’ as their eggs hatch during the spring, when they are stimulated by the warmer weather and rainy conditions. 

But the baby huntsman recently spotted across the country have appeared because some spiders do two rounds of breeding. 

Dr Lowe warned that it’s best to just let baby huntsman do their own thing – as they’re more likely to turn on each other than cause you harm.

‘When the babies hatch out, they disperse very quickly over one or two days. They are highly cannibalistic and don’t want to be eaten by their nestmates. Also they need to have their own food so it’s within their own interests to disperse,’ she said.

‘There’s probably only enough food for one huntsman in each house.’

Dr Lowe’s comments come after a Sydney mum took photos of baby spiders infiltrating her daughter’s bedroom. 

She shared the terrifying images with a friend, who posted them on social media. 

The friend said: ‘They’re bigger than the tiny babies I’ve seen. You can see how big they are by the window.’

Dr Lowe's comments come after a Sydney mum took photos of baby spiders infiltrating her daughter's bedroom (pictured)

Dr Lowe’s comments come after a Sydney mum took photos of baby spiders infiltrating her daughter’s bedroom (pictured)

‘They are fast and they jump and they’re big. I catch them and put them outside. This, however, would totally freak me out.’ 

Another woman posted on Facebook in a bid to find nearby pest control experts after spotting ten gigantic spiders in her bedroom.

The woman, who lives on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, reached breaking point after spotting the arachnids in her closet.

‘Hello. I am losing my mind. Ten of these giant mammoth spiders in the last month,’ she wrote to a community Facebook group. 

‘I need a pest man to come save me and spray my apartment in Newport. Any recommendations?’ 

Another woman posted on Facebook in a bid to find nearby pest control experts after spotting ten gigantic spiders in her bedroom

Another woman posted on Facebook in a bid to find nearby pest control experts after spotting ten gigantic spiders in her bedroom 

This post was first published on DailyMail.

- Advertisement -

Latest news

- Advertisement -

Related news

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here