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Saturday, February 27, 2021

Aboriginal woman slams trolls who ask her what ‘percentage’ indigenous she is

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An indigenous pilates instructor is sick of being asked her what ‘percentage’ Aboriginal she is due to her light complexion.

Lily Hodgson, 23, who posts TikTok videos under the account Thrlils about her cultural history, is often targeted by trolls questioning her right to celebrate her racial identity.

‘At what generation do you stop calling yourself Aboriginal? ten, five, or two per cent? Will your grandchildren still be claiming to be Aboriginal?’ one wrote.

But the proud Wiradjuri woman hit back, calling them ‘uneducated morons’ and said being Aboriginal has nothing to do with skin colour.

Lily Hodgson, 23,  (pictured) has hit back at online trolls who questioned her right to celebrate her Aboriginal heritage

Lily Hodgson, 23,  (pictured) has hit back at online trolls who questioned her right to celebrate her Aboriginal heritage

‘Let me guess, you’re one of the ones  who solely and wholly believe Aboriginality is based on skin colour,’ she said in a video addressing the comment. 

‘My grand kids will not be claiming anything – they simply will be Aboriginal, Wiradjuri and proud.

‘You may see my face, but there are thousands of us with this sickening and saddening story that we have to keep telling whenever people like you question our Aboriginality.

‘I have said it countless times, but I will keep saying it until this country is educated enough to stop asking – we look like this because our families were raped and stolen. 

‘If you cannot separate skin colour from culture you are a f**king moron.’ 

The TikTok star from the NSW Central Coast earlier told Daily Mail Australia she felt the need to speak out after copping a ‘magnitude of bigotry’ on the platform.

‘It’s tiring that others feel the need to pressure me to explain myself or any other indigenous individual,’ she said.

It is not the first time in recent weeks Ms Hodgson has been attacked for expressing her cultural heritage.

Ms Hodgson, who identifies as a proud Wiradjuri woman, is pictured in indigenous tribal paint

Ms Hodgson, who identifies as a proud Wiradjuri woman, is pictured in indigenous tribal paint

Earlier this month, she was berated by social media users after she got a tattoo of the Aboriginal flag on her arm. 

‘You are white! Stop pretending like you understand the struggle that a real Aboriginal has been through, quite insulting,’ one commenter said.  

Responding to her critics in a video online, she said: ‘You don’t know that my father was part of the stolen generations and you don’t know that my aunts and uncles were beaten and raped.’

‘Being Aboriginal has nothing to do with my skin colour. I have 60,000 years of blood within me.’

Her aunt Elizabeth Hodgson is an acclaimed author who wrote Skin Painting – a memoir which examines the struggles of Indigenous Australians.

The book reflects on the stolen generations, a period between 1905 to 1967 when a number of Aboriginal children were removed from their families by church missions on the orders of the Australian government.

‘The stolen generation was basically to bleed the Aboriginal blood out of society so there could be a supreme white Australia,’ Ms Hodgson said in one of her TikTok clips.

Ms Hodgson, who posts under the account Thrlils on TikTok recently got a tattoo of the Aboriginal flag on her arm, prompting some social media users to dispute her racial identity

Ms Hodgson, who posts under the account Thrlils on TikTok recently got a tattoo of the Aboriginal flag on her arm, prompting some social media users to dispute her racial identity

‘Hence the reason why I don’t have beautiful dark hair, dark eyes or seriously dark skin… because they tried to bleed us out.’  

The Wiradjuri people have lived within NSW modern-day New South Wales for more than 60,000 years, and they are the largest cultural footprint within the state. 

Their traditional country extends from the Great Dividing Range down to the Murray River and out to western NSW, and includes the townships of Dubbo, Condobolin, Orange, Bathurst, Wagga Wagga, Albury, Narrandera, and Griffith.   

Ms Hodgson said it’s important for Australians to look beyond appearance when it comes to Aboriginality and be more respectful about cultural identity.

‘If somebody tells you that they are Aboriginal and they don’t fit whenever your idea of what an Aboriginal person is supposed to be… it is not an invitation to pick that person’s life apart,’ she said.

Ms Hodgson works as a Pilates instructor and lives on the Central Coast of New South Wales

Ms Hodgson works as a Pilates instructor and lives on the Central Coast of New South Wales

This post was first published on DailyMail.

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